World Diabetes Day was established by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the International Diabetes Foundation (IDF) in order to increase awareness of diabetes and the importance of managing it. World Diabetes Day is held on the 14th November each year as that is the date that Sir Frederick Banting, co-discoverer of insulin, was born.

The number of people diagnosed with Diabetes has doubled in the last 20 years therefore increasing awareness is important to be able to recognise and manage the condition as early as possible.

Self Management UK offers courses for people with Type II diabetes, or those at risk of developing diabetes, called X-PERT Diabetes. This course is a 6-week course (2.5 hours per session) and has been developed to raise the knowledge, skills, awareness and confidence of participants. It is important to know how to self-manage your condition as on average, people living with a health condition spend just 4 hours per year with their healthcare team. Our course is designed to enable you make informed decisions about your lifestyle and management of your condition. More information on our X-PERT Diabetes course, click here. We have another course which covers diabetes as well as other long-term health conditions. This course empowers patients to manage any health condition. For information on this course, click here.

Our approach to self-management has delivered results nearly three times better than the national average. We continually benchmark our performance against over 100 providers of the X-PERT Health, X-PERT Diabetes course nationally and consistently deliver recruitment, attendance and retention rates that are in the top 10 performances. Our average HbA1c mmol/mol at post course follow up was 47.1, against 62.3 at referral. Our average course recruitment is 19 people per course, against a national average of 12.4 people (data is compared with 111 Clinical Commissioning Groups).

There are other websites which also provide lots of information about diabetes, including Diabetes UK (https://www.diabetes.org.uk) and the NHS (https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/diabetes/).

To find out about more our services contact us on 03333 445 840 or [email protected]